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"Helmut Gollwitzer: Forgotten Left-Wing Barthian" – Video of my AAR / KBSNA Presentation Now Online

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Some folks around Twitter have noticed that the most recent issue of the Karl Barth Society of North America newsletter contains extensive notes from my presentation to the society at the meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Boston in 2017. I’ve been sitting on video of that presentation since then, but didn’t want to publish it until the notes appeared in the KBSNA newsletter. But now you can view the video and hear me present the paper as if you were in the room (which a number of Tweeps were), growly voice and all.


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Latest Updates on “Our God Loves Justice” (#OGLJ)

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Just because DET has been unnaturally quiet for a while doesn’t mean that I haven’t been up to other of my usual tricks or that there hasn’t been stuff happening. Quite the contrary, in fact. And this post will get you back up to speed on my book, Our God Loves Justice: An Introduction to Helmut Golwitzer.



I present the following in no particular order:

One: I appeared on Liam Miller’s podcast – “Love, Rinse, Repeat” – to talk about Gollwitzer, and the true socialism of the kingdom of God.



Two: I joined Dean Dettloff and Matt Bernico on The Magnificast. Click here to listen!

Three: I returned for another appearance on the Homebrewed Christianity podcast. Click here to listen! See you at theology beer camp?

Four: #OGLJ was “briefly noted” by The Presbyterian Outlook.

Five: Stephen Waldron reviewed #OGLJ for Reading Religion, an online publication from the AAR.

Six: David Roberts included #OGLJ in his list of “things I’ve read recently that you should read too.”

Seven: I discussed Gollwitz…

Meanwhile, back at the ranch…

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…or, Something to keep you busy over the weekend…

…or, The Past Fortnight in the Theoblogosphere.

*chuckles*

More like “The Past Five Months in the Theoblogosphere.”

What happened? I couldn’t even tell you at this point. My intrepid associate editor, Scott Jackson, and I simply ran out of steam. Or hit a brick wall of other work. Or whatever mental picture you prefer. At this point I’m trying to come to grips with the reality that it’s unlikely we’ll be able to mount a regular posting schedule again, perhaps ever. Time will tell.

So DET is not over, but it has become and will continue to be more of an ad hoc thing.

That said, I still have a bunch of links to share. But before the links I want to highlight one of the highlights of my activities on the interwebs during the aforementioned five months – namely, Juan Torres’s interview of David Congdon and me. I commend it to you, if you haven’t seen it yet, as an excellent place to begin if you want to get a peek behind the McMakenian…

Responding to Hunsicker concerning Gollwitzer and “Our God Loves Justice”

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Many thanks to David Hunsicker, whom I have known low these many years, for his recent blog review of my book on Helmut Gollwitzer: Our God Loves Justice: An Introduction to Helmut Gollwitzer.



Hunsicker spends a great deal of time laying out the shape of the book, so be sure to head on over if you’re looking for a precis of the work that will whet your appetite and drive you to your favorite bookseller in search of a copy. I would like to respond briefly to two of Hunsicker’s three concluding thoughts. (Folks are, of course, welcome to make connections between Golli and Yoder – it’s just that I’m not particularly interested in that conversation.)

Hunsicker’s second and third points derive from a fundamental failure to grasp the dialectical theological concept of paradoxical identity, which I have written about at some length in various places. TL:DR = the divine is wholly other than the human (paradox), but they are nonobjectifiably identical in – and only in – the event of encounte…

Not as Children of Death: Stroupe on the Resurrection

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Death, according to Nibs Stroupe, casts a heavy screen over our vision, beclouding not only our view of the surrounding world, but also hiding from us our true identity as beloved children of God. In a sermon on the encounter in the garden between the Risen Jesus and Mary of Magdala (John 20:1-18), Stroupe interprets resurrection as "recognition."

Deeper Waters: Sermons for a New Vision, By Nibs Stroupe (edited by Collin Cornell) (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2017).

Mary is the only individual mentioned in all four Gospel accounts of the resurrection, and in the passage from John, she is the first witness to meet the risen Lord. The church, as Stroupe notes, has often been embarrassed to name women as primary witnesses to the resurrection. (If even the Apostle Paul neglects to mention Mary and other women in is paradigmatic resurrection keryma -- I Cor. 15 -- it is hardly surprising that later interpreters would stumble over this fact as well. And check out Luke 24:1-12 for …

So, You Want To Read Helmut Gollwitzer?

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This is a post that I have needed to write for a long time. I’ve put off writing it until now, however, because I’ve been carrying on an argument with myself about what the best way to organize it would be. I’ve spent a lot of time with Gollwitzer over the past half a dozen years or so, and it’s hard to boil down everything I want to say about Gollwitzer into some clear, straightforward advice.

Of course, if you want the long version, you can always read my book: Our God Loves Justice: An Introduction to Helmut Gollwitzer (Fortress, 2017). It just so happens that this is the best secondary source on Gollwitzer available in English so, you know, it’s a must read. But don’t take my word on it. Heath Carter agrees, as the photo below shows:


Anyway, back to the task at hand. You, gentle reader, want to read Helmut Gollwitzer. Perhaps you’ve already read my book and are now ready to dive into Golli himself and get a first hand picture. Maybe you want to form some of your own opinions by …

Demonic Possession is Not the New Normal:
More from Nibs Stroupe

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The story of Jesus liberating the Gerasene demoniac (Luke 8:26-39 and parallels) has long bedeviled modern interpreters (stop groaning at the pun, please, gentle readers). A New Testament scholar as esteemed as E.P. Sanders once had to admit he wasn't quite sure what to make of this story (see his The Historical Figure of Jesus). Is this vignette simply a case of ancient superstition, or might it have something to say to us directly today?

Deeper Waters: Sermons for a New Vision, By Nibs Stroupe (edited by Collin Cornell) (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2017).

Nibs Stroupe, a Presbyterian preacher from Georgia, has some perceptive insights here. (For some background on Stroupe, see my previous post.) Like many other Western readers today, he reflectively recoils from exorcism stories, yet he invites us to take a closer look at the multiple assaults of death-dealing powers that afflict human beings. He invites us to shift our focus away from metaphysical speculation on the demons in …